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Sega’s Genesis/Mega Drive Mini arrives in September

By |March 30th, 2019|

Whether you call it the Genesis or the Mega Drive, Sega’s 16 bit system holds a special place in the hearts of many a gamer who came of age in the 80s and 90s. Like the NES and Super Nintendo before it, the console that gave us a ring-hoarding hedgehog is about to get miniaturized. --> READ MORE

EC Weekly: Gaming, crypto, shipping and the multiple future strategies of tech

By |March 30th, 2019|

Niantic EC-1 Illustration by Nigel Sussman Greg Kumparak published the first part of his planned four part EC-1 series on Niantic yesterday, focusing on the founding story of the AR/gaming unicorn from Keyhole and Google Earth to a complicated spinout from Alphabet. Lots of great nuggets on how companies get formed and built, but one --> READ MORE

Remote workers and nomads represent the next tech hub

By |March 30th, 2019|

Amid calls for a dozen different global cities to replace Silicon Valley — Austin, Beijing, London, New York — nobody has yet nominated “nowhere.” But it’s now a possibility. There are two trends to unpack here. The first is startups that are fully, or almost fully, remote, with employees distributed around the world. There’s a --> READ MORE

Startups Weekly: Why Lyft’s $2.2B IPO wasn’t “crazy land” or “nuts”

By |March 30th, 2019|

Lyft completed its long-awaited IPO this week, trading 21 percent higher Friday than its initial offering price of $72 per share. It closed its first day of trading at about $78 per share, up roughly 9 percent. I spoke to IPO guru Brian Hamilton, the CEO of banking software company Sageworks, about Lyft’s offering to --> READ MORE

In San Francisco, a fight over a homeless shelter shines a harsh light on a conflicted population

By |March 30th, 2019|

As of 2017, there were roughly 7,000 people living without homes in San Francisco, a number that comprises minors — a lot of them. The San Francisco Unified School District estimates that as of 2017, roughly 2,100 of the children in the school system were homeless —  a number that it said looked to be --> READ MORE

Valve is building its own high-end VR headset called ‘Index’

By |March 30th, 2019|

Valve is ready to sell its own full VR hardware getup. The gaming giant behind some classic titles and the ubiquitous Steam store has revealed a teaser image on its site of a VR headset called the Valve Index. Alongside the photo, text reads “Upgrade your experience. May 2019” suggesting a near-term full announcement or --> READ MORE

Toast, the restaurant management platform, has raised $250M at a $2.7B valuation

By |March 29th, 2019|

Restaurant sales hit $825 billion last year in the U.S., but with margins averaging at only three to five percent per business, they’re always looking for an edge on efficiency and just generally running things in a smarter way. A startup called Toast, which has built a popular platform for restaurant management, has closed a --> READ MORE

Equity Shot: Lyft is public — what does that mean for other IPO-ready unicorns?

By |March 29th, 2019|

Hello and welcome back to Equity, TechCrunch’s venture capital-focused podcast, where we unpack the numbers behind the headlines. Sure, we just aired a new episode, but things keep happening, and after talking about this crop of IPOs for so long, we can’t help ourselves. (You can follow us on Twitter, here and here, by the way, --> READ MORE

Apple sells wireless charging AirPods, cancels charger days later

By |March 29th, 2019|

“Works with AirPower mat”. Apparently not. It looks to me like Apple doesn’t treat customers with the same “high standard” of care it apparently reserves for its hardware quality. Nine days after launching its $199 wireless charging AirPods headphones that touted compatibility with the forthcoming Apple AirPower inductive charger mat, Apple has just scrapped AirPower --> READ MORE

Lyft closes up 9% on first day of trading

By |March 29th, 2019|

Pink confetti fell from the ceiling Friday as Lyft co-founders Logan Green and John Zimmer celebrated their company’s IPO. The stock offering was a bona fide success, with shares selling for $87.24 apiece Friday morning — 21 percent higher than Lyft’s initial $72 share price — and closing at $78.29 per share. Lyft raised roughly --> READ MORE